How is IBD treated?
Before you go through the IBD&me Decision Tree, it’s important to first know the different ways to treat IBD. There are many treatment options other than biologics, such as steroids, aminosalicylates, and immunomodulators. You may have tried one or more of these in the past. View the different tabs below to learn more about each of these medicines.
Steroids
Aminosalicylates
Immunomodulators

ex: Prednisone, Deltasone, Medrol, Entocort, Uceris, etc.

  • Fast-acting drugs that decrease inflammation in the intestines by suppressing the immune system
  • Taken by mouth in pill form, through rectal suppositories or enemas, or given through an IV into the vein
  • Work well in the short-term, but cannot be used for long periods of time because of serious side effects such as weak bones, weight gain, and infections
Steroids

ex: Prednisone, Deltasone, Medrol, Entocort, Uceris, etc.

  • Fast-acting drugs that decrease inflammation in the intestines by suppressing the immune system
  • Taken by mouth in pill form, through rectal suppositories or enemas, or given through an IV into the vein
  • Work well in the short-term, but cannot be used for long periods of time because of serious side effects such as weak bones, weight gain, and infections
Aminosalicylates

ex: Asacol HD, Lialda, Apriso, Pentasa, Azulfidine, etc.

  • Can treat mild to moderate cases of ulcerative colitis
  • Decrease inflammation locally in the colon without suppressing the immune system
  • Taken by mouth in pill form or given through rectal suppositories or enemas
  • Well-tolerated and have few serious side effects
Immunomodulators

ex: Imuran, Azathioprine, 6-Mercaptopurine, etc.

  • Decrease inflammation in the intestines by suppressing the immune system
  • Slow-acting drugs that can take 3 to 6 months to start working
  • Taken by mouth in pill form
  • Can have serious side effects such as liver damage, inflammation of the pancreas, low blood counts, or lymphoma